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Thursday, March 1, 2018

+Myth: Judith Curry Fully and Accurately Represents Scientific Research

The outline for this post is as follows:
  1. The Myth and Its Flaw
  2. Context and Analysis
  3. Posts Providing Further Information and Analysis
  4. References

This is the "+References" version of this post, which means that this post contains my full list of references and citations. If you would like an abbreviated and easier to read version, then please go to the "main version" version of this post.

References are cited as follows: "[#]", with "#" corresponding to the reference number given in the References section at the end of this post.




1.  The Myth and Its Flaw



Judith Curry is a prominent critic of mainstream science on anthropogenic (man-made) global warming (AGW) [1 - 4]. A number of parties champion her positions and cite her as an accurate source of climate science information [88 - 94], including the George C. Marshall Institute [91], the Global Warming Policy Foundation [90], The Daily Mail [92], The Washington Times [94], John Stossel [93], and the "lukewarmer [95]" Matt Ridley [89]. Curry's reliable representation of scientific research is the myth this blogpost addresses.

Myth: Judith Curry Fully and Accurately Represents Scientific Research

The outline for this post is as follows:
  1. The Myth and Its Flaw
  2. Context and Analysis
  3. Posts Providing Further Information and Analysis
  4. References

This is the "main version" version of this post, which means that this post lacks most of my references and citations. If you would like a more comprehensive versions with all the references and citations, then please go to the "+References" version of this post.

References are cited as follows: "[#]", with "#" corresponding to the reference number given in the References section at the end of this post.




1.  The Myth and Its Flaw



Judith Curry is a prominent critic of mainstream science on anthropogenic (man-made) global warming (AGW)A number of parties champion her positions and cite her as an accurate source of climate science information, including the George C. Marshall Institute, the Global Warming Policy Foundation, The Daily Mail, The Washington Times, John Stossel, and the "lukewarmer" Matt Ridley. Curry's reliable representation of scientific research is the myth this blogpost addresses.

Myth: Evidence Supports Curry's Claims Regarding Satellite-based Analyses and the Hot Spot

The outline for this post is as follows:
  1. The Myth and Its Flaw
  2. Context and Analysis (Divided into 3 sections)
  3. Posts Providing Further Information and Analysis
  4. References

This is the "+References" version of this post, which means that this post contains my full list of references and citations. If you would like an abbreviated and easier to read version, then please go to the "main version" version of this post.

References are cited as follows: "[#]", with "#" corresponding to the reference number given in the References section at the end of this post.





1.  The Myth and Its Flaw



Climate models predict that in moist tropical areas, a region of the lower atmosphere known as the troposphere will warm more than Earth's surface. This region of greater warming is known as the "hot spot". Judith Curry, a critic of mainstream climate science, casts doubt on the hot spot's existence. She also casts doubt on a recent satellite-based analysis of tropospheric warming. Curry's claims on these topics constitute the myth this blogpost rebuts.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

+Myth: Evidence Supports Curry's Claims Regarding Satellite-based Analyses and the Hot Spot

The outline for this post is as follows:
  1. The Myth and Its Flaw
  2. Context and Analysis (Divided into 3 sections)
  3. Posts Providing Further Information and Analysis
  4. References

This is the "+References" version of this post, which means that this post contains my full list of references and citations. If you would like an abbreviated and easier to read version, then please go to the "main version" version of this post.

References are cited as follows: "[#]", with "#" corresponding to the reference number given in the References section at the end of this post.





1.  The Myth and Its Flaw



Climate models predict that in moist tropical areas, a region of the lower atmosphere known as the troposphere will warm more than Earth's surface. This region of greater warming is known as the "hot spot" [1, pages 14 and 42; 2; 3, page 6; 4]. Judith Curry, a critic of mainstream climate science, casts doubt on the hot spot's existence [5; 6]. She also casts doubt on a recent satellite-based analysis of tropospheric warming [7]. Curry's claims on these topics constitute the myth this blogpost rebuts.

Thursday, February 1, 2018

+Myth: The CCSP Presented Evidence Against the Hot Spot's Existence

This post is part of a series addressing issues related to the hot spot. The other parts of this series are listed in the "Myths about the Hot Spot" section of the "Quick Scientific Debunking" page.


The outline for this post is as follows:
  1. The Myth and Its Flaw
  2. Context and Analysis
  3. Posts Providing Further Information and Analysis
  4. References

This is the "+References" version of this post, which means that this post contains my full list of references and citations. If you would like an abbreviated and easier to read version, then please go to the "main version" version of this post.

References are cited as follows: "[#]", with "#" corresponding to the reference number given in the References section at the end of this post.




1.  The Myth and Its Flaw



Climate models predict that in moist tropical areas, a region of the lower atmosphere will warm more than Earth's surface [19, page 4; 20 - 23; 24, from 31:01 to 31:48]. This region of greater warming is known as the "hot spot" [25, pages 14 and 42; 26; 27, page 6; 28]. The myth claims that a 2006 report of the United States Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) [36, figure 5.7 on page 116] provided evidence against the hot spot's existence [2 - 18]. Many myth advocates resort to deception (or willful avoidance of evidence) in order to defend this myth.